Mark Thornton

Photo of ()\

Mark Thornton is the world's first executive meditation coach. Trained as an investment banker, he was interim Chief Operating Officer for JP Morgan in London. A student and practitioner of meditation for over 20 years, Mark Thornton has worked with over 30 teachers in 7 countries to find the best techniques for super-busy people.

Listen to Tami Simon's interview with Mark Thornton: Meditation at Work»

Also By Author

Mark Thornton: Meditation at Work

Mark Thornton has more than 20 years of experience in meditation, and has become one of the world’s leading executive meditation coaches, specializing in finding the best techniques for busy people. He’s the author of the Sounds True audio learning program and book Meditation in a New York Minute. In this episode of Insights at the Edge, Mark and Tami Simon discuss his personal journey, which took him from being an investment banker to being a meditation coach. They consider the ways that Mark helps his clients find both a sense of purpose and a sense of meaningful connection with the people that matter most to them. Finally, Mark offers practices to create calm even in the midst of the chaos of our busy lives.
(55 minutes)

You Might Also Enjoy

Giving Your Heart Over to Real Change

In this podcast, Sharon Salzberg joins Sounds True’s founder, Tami Simon, to discuss her recent book, Real Change: Mindfulness to Heal Ourselves and the World—and how you can begin to bring the core of your being into your work, your community, and your life. Sharon and Tami also discuss how contemplative practices can open the heart, agency and reclaiming your power to effect change, the empowering symbol of the Statue of Liberty, transforming anger into courage, determining the next step you can take when you’re uncertain, patience, faith as the act of giving over your heart, generosity and how you end up with more through giving, moving from grief to resilience, suffering and the First Noble Truth, the role of joy on the path, living by the truth of interconnection, caring to know as the first step in making a difference, and a sneak preview of Sharon’s forthcoming book, Real Life.

Our Evolutionary Leap

In this podcast, Lynne joins Sounds True’s founder, Tami Simon, to discuss the challenges and opportunities now facing humanity—and the invitation to each one of us to make a difference as we embrace this critical time in our evolution at the beginning of a new millennium. 

Lynne and Tami also talk about our unique place in time and the emerging new approach to business; the Pachamama Alliance and the prophecy of “The Eagle and the Condor”; tapping the wisdom of “grandmother energy”; Buckminster Fuller and creating a world that works for everyone; the invitation to each one of us to “take an evolutionary leap and dream big now”; environmental regeneration and redefining humanity; reclaiming our home in the ecological world, and creating economies that respect nature; giving up the scramble and becoming totally present in the moments of our life; purpose, choices, and trusting our feelings; bravery, humility, and surrender on the path; and more

Rewriting Your Food Story

Elise Museles is on the board of directors for the Environmental Working Group, a holistic health expert, and the host of the podcast Once Upon a Food Story. With Sounds True, she’s released the new book Food Story: Rewrite the Way You Eat, Think, and Live. In this episode of Insights at the Edge, Tami Simon speaks with Elise about the concept of “food stories”—your personal relationship with food and eating, defined not only by your own experiences but by the familial and cultural messages you grew up with. They discuss the different kinds of food stories, their origins, and what it takes to “rewrite” your own food story. Elise details different ways you can shift your attitudes toward food, including mindful eating, acceptance of your body’s needs, and cutting screens out of your meals. Finally, Tami and Elise talk about the therapeutic quality of food prep, how to tailor recipes to specific moods, and why “emotional eating” isn’t always a bad thing. 

 

>