Caroline Adams Miller: Getting Grit

May 2, 2017

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Caroline Miller is one of the world’s foremost experts in positive psychology and the author of books such as Creating Your Best Life and My Name Is Caroline. With Sounds True, she has recently published Getting Grit: The Evidence-Based Approach to Cultivating Passion, Perseverance, and Purpose. In this episode of Insights at the Edge, Tami Simon and Caroline discuss the concept of “grit”—the ability to stay passionate and persistent in one’s long-term goals even in the face of considerable hardship. Caroline explains the different kinds of grit, including “false grit” that encourages stubbornness or flatters the ego. Finally, Tami and Caroline talk about the startling fact that we don’t become happy when we are successful; rather, we become successful because we’re happy first. (56 minutes)

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Caroline Adams Miller: Getting Grit

Caroline Miller is one of the world’s foremost experts in positive psychology and the author of books such as Creating Your Best Life and My Name Is Caroline. With Sounds True, she has recently published Getting Grit: The Evidence-Based Approach to Cultivating Passion, Perseverance, and Purpose. In this episode of Insights at the Edge, Tami Simon and Caroline discuss the concept of “grit”—the ability to stay passionate and persistent in one’s long-term goals even in the face of considerable hardship. Caroline explains the different kinds of grit, including “false grit” that encourages stubbornness or flatters the ego. Finally, Tami and Caroline talk about the startling fact that we don’t become happy when we are successful; rather, we become successful because we’re happy first. (56 minutes)

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