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Jack Kornfield

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Jack Kornfield, PhD, trained as a Buddhist monk in Thailand, Burma, and India and has taught worldwide since 1974. He is one of the key teachers to introduce Buddhist mindfulness practices to the West. He holds a PhD in clinical psychology and is the co-founder of the Insight Meditation Society and of Spirit Rock Center in Woodacre, California. He has written more than a dozen books including The Wise Heart; A Path With Heart; After the Ecstasy, the Laundry; and more.

Listen to Tami Simon's in-depth audio podcast interviews with Jack Kornfield:
Big Insights: The Power of Awareness to Change Your Life »
Difficult Times & Liberation »

Also By Author

Mindfulness and the Brain – with Jack Kornfield ...

Mindful awareness creates scientifically recognized enhancements in psychology, mental functions, and in our interpersonal relationships. But how can we integrate this information into our personal or professional lives? In the Mindfulness and the Brain online course, Jack Kornfield, PhD, and Dan Siegel, MD, offer theoretical and experiential teachings on the power of inner transformation and the cultivation of a wise and loving heart. With thoughtful dialogue and practical tools, this interactive professional development training offers therapists, healers, educators, parents, meditation practitioners—and anyone else interested in developing a healthy mind—an intriguing exploration of what it means for us and our world to be able to shift our awareness.

Complete with memorable anecdotes and real-life stories that illustrate key concepts, Mindfulness and the Brain offers a comprehensive training with specific learning objectives including: utilizing mindful practice to help reduce suffering and promote resilience; how a “resonance circuit” enables an individual to attune to oneself and others; and incorporating intrapersonal attunement to catalyze mental, interpersonal, and psychological well-being. Via weekly video downloads, you’ll receive more than seven hours of progressive insights and teachings from these renowned experts as well as seven different practices and exercises on audio to use in your personal or professional life. To deepen your learning, two live interactive Q&A sessions will be offered with Jack Kornfield and Dan Siegel.

From thorough explanations of scientific findings and down-to-earth Buddhist perspectives to moments of stillness and laughter, Mindfulness and the Brain invites you to discover a more integrated and connected way of knowing and developing a wise and loving heart.

What Makes a Healthy Mind

Tami Simon speaks with Dan Siegel, MD, a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine and the executive director of the Mindsight Institute in Los Angeles. He is the author of several books, including The Developing Mind; the Sounds True audio learning programs The Mindful Brain and The Neurobiology of We; and the October Soundstrue.com online course Mindfulness and the Brain. Dan discusses what it means to have a healthy mind. (68 Minutes)

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